ecto-code

Design is not just what it looks like and feels like.
Design is how it works.

theurbanhistorian:

Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar

Bagac, Bataan

Finally had the chance to visit the controversial Resort at Bagac, Bataan.

Why controversial?

The resort is actually an assemblage of some turn of the century “Bahay na Bato” from the different provinces of the country. The houses are dismantled at their original locations to be reassembled and built in Bagac, Bataan. Some heritage advocates frown at this as dismantling the old houses robs the authenticity and the sense of place and history of the structure and the place itself.

But that contentious issue aside, I find the place nice and good, but of course it lacks the authenticity and charm the original Filipino - Hispanic towns like Vigan and Intramuros has. I think that can’t be just manufactured of forced.

Also, they are “reconstructing” Binondo’s Hotel de Oriente in their lot too. Or they are just building a building in the style of the said defunct hotel.

Have you visited the place already? What are your thoughts on this?

smediaportal:

The Philippines’s First Biggest Solar Power Plant Inaugurated.
"The solar farm will provide supplemental electricity to an area of short supply and increasing demand for power.
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smediaportal:

The Philippines’s First Biggest Solar Power Plant Inaugurated.

"The solar farm will provide supplemental electricity to an area of short supply and increasing demand for power.

gasoline-station:

Curving Porch, Sottile House, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC
by Doug Hickok  
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gasoline-station:

Curving Porch, Sottile House, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC

by Doug Hickok  

(Source: hueandeye.blogspot.com)

architecturelab:

Zoological Park of #Paris
Last month, the Parc Zoologique de Paris reopened after a six-year renovation by Bernard Tschumi Architects. A branch of the National Museum of Natural History, it is commonly referred to as the Zoo de Vincennes, because it is located in the Bois de Vincennes, a 2,459-acre park on the city’s east side.
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architecturelab:

Zoological Park of #Paris

Last month, the Parc Zoologique de Paris reopened after a six-year renovation by Bernard Tschumi Architects. A branch of the National Museum of Natural History, it is commonly referred to as the Zoo de Vincennes, because it is located in the Bois de Vincennes, a 2,459-acre park on the city’s east side.

gasoline-station:

Two house by Ney Lima

1 • Taquari House • Brasília • Brazil 
2 • Cobogó house  • Brasília • Brazil 

(via archdaily méxico)

(Source: ombuarchitecture)

thegreenurbanist:

vicemag:

Crude Journalism: Chevron Bought a Newspaper to Mask Its Bad Record on Safety Abuses
Richmond is tucked into California’s western tricep, a former wine town with a population just over 100,000. Under the administration of Mayor Gayle McLaughlin, the town is the largest city in the United States with a Green Party mayor. It’s also an oil town—in 1901, Standard Oil set up a tank farm, choosing the location for its easy access to San Francisco Bay. Soon after, a western terminus of the Santa Fe Railroad was built in Richmond to handle the outflux of crude. Over the course of the 20th century, Standard Oil became the Standard Oil Company of California (SOCAL), and later, Chevron.
Throughout the 90s, the Richmond refinery was fined thousands of dollars for unsafe conditions, explosions, major fires, and chemical leaks, as the plant oozed chlorine and sulfur trioxide into Richmond’s atmosphere. In August of 2012, the Richmond refinery exploded after Chevron ignored the warning of corroding pipes from the local safety board. The disaster was linked to aging pipes, which were simply clamped instead of replaced altogether. Some 15,000 residents in the surrounding area were forced to seek medical treatment, and Chevron’s CEO, John Watson, got a $7.5 million dollar raise.
Continue

“There may be a lot of jobs in oil, but there aren’t any jobs at all when the town you live in is on fire.”
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thegreenurbanist:

vicemag:

Crude Journalism: Chevron Bought a Newspaper to Mask Its Bad Record on Safety Abuses

Richmond is tucked into California’s western tricep, a former wine town with a population just over 100,000. Under the administration of Mayor Gayle McLaughlin, the town is the largest city in the United States with a Green Party mayor. It’s also an oil town—in 1901, Standard Oil set up a tank farm, choosing the location for its easy access to San Francisco Bay. Soon after, a western terminus of the Santa Fe Railroad was built in Richmond to handle the outflux of crude. Over the course of the 20th century, Standard Oil became the Standard Oil Company of California (SOCAL), and later, Chevron.

Throughout the 90s, the Richmond refinery was fined thousands of dollars for unsafe conditions, explosions, major fires, and chemical leaks, as the plant oozed chlorine and sulfur trioxide into Richmond’s atmosphere. In August of 2012, the Richmond refinery exploded after Chevron ignored the warning of corroding pipes from the local safety board. The disaster was linked to aging pipes, which were simply clamped instead of replaced altogether. Some 15,000 residents in the surrounding area were forced to seek medical treatment, and Chevron’s CEO, John Watson, got a $7.5 million dollar raise.

Continue

There may be a lot of jobs in oil, but there aren’t any jobs at all when the town you live in is on fire.”

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